Sarah Passingham

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Here's the serious answer: In 1952, before I was born, my father was six weeks married and training for the Olympics - his sport was rowing - and then he caught polio. He was in isolation for 2 months - no visitors. It paralysed him and he was never able to walk again, however, while he was in hospital trying to recuperate, he also caught TB, the combination kept him in hospital, on and off, until 1959. Throughout, the thing that kept him rooted to the outside world, and especially the countryside where he came from, was The Archers. In our house, when finally my parents were able to put all that behind them and enjoy their new family, everything stopped when it was time to listen to \\\'an everyday story of country folk\\\', and it was treated with the similar reverence as a church service. I can\\\'t remember a time when I didn\\\'t hear it, except during the term times at boarding school. It kept my father sane, it gave my parents something in common to talk about and share over all those years apart, and I think it taught me to love drama and how to tell a good story. And now my mother is 86 (sadly my father died 11 years ago) it has given us something to share and argue over too!
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United Kingdom
Norfolk

Here's the serious answer: In 1952, before I was born, my father was six weeks married and training for the Olympics - his sport was rowing - and then he caught polio. He was in isolation for 2 months - no visitors. It paralysed him and he was never able to walk again, however, while he was in hospital trying to recuperate, he also caught TB, the combination kept him in hospital, on and off, until 1959. Throughout, the thing that kept him rooted to the outside world, and especially the countryside where he came from, was The Archers. In our house, when finally my parents were able to put all that behind them and enjoy their new family, everything stopped when it was time to listen to 'an everyday story of country folk', and it was treated with the similar reverence as a church service. I can't remember a time when I didn't hear it, except during the term times at boarding school. It kept my father sane, it gave my parents something in common to talk about and share over all those years apart, and I think it taught me to love drama and how to tell a good story. And now my mother is 86 (sadly my father died 11 years ago) it has given us something to share and argue over too!